The Thinker and his Thought

Excerpt from J Krishnamurti’s talks:

Question: What is the relation between the thinker and his thought?

Krishnamurti: Now, is there any such relation, or is there only one thing, which is thought, and not the thinker? Because, if there are no thoughts, there is no thinker. When you are thinking, when you have thoughts, is there a thinker? If you have no thoughts at all, where is the thinker? Now, having thoughts, seeing the impermanence of thoughts, the thinker comes into being. That is, thought creates the thinker; and because thoughts are transient, the thinker becomes the permanent entity. There is first the process of thought, and then thought creates the thinker, obviously. The thinker then establishes himself as a permanent entity, apart from thoughts. That is, thoughts are transient, they are always in a state of flux, and thought objects to its own impermanence; therefore, thought creates the thinker. It is not the other way round, the thinker does not create thought, If you have no thoughts, there is no thinker; so it is thought that creates the thinker. Then we try to establish a relationship between the thinker, and the thought which has created him. That is, we try to establish a relationship between that which seeks to be permanent, which is the thinker created by thought, and the thought itself, which is transient. But obviously both are transient, Since thought, which is transient, creates the thinker, and though the thinker may imagine himself to be permanent, he also is transient; because the thinker is the outcome of thought.

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Being Alone!

Being alone doesn’t mean you’re lonely, it doesn’t mean voidness or you’re waiting for someone to join you and come along. Sometimes to be alone with your own thoughts only is soothing and wonderful. Being alone, sitting beside a waterfall, watching the water flowing, listening to the tranquil sound of running water and enjoying every single bit of it, does it sound good to you? It does to me.

Snapshot From Dharamshala

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Dharamshala (India)

Since 2 days I’m staying at this place called Dharamshala, in the lap of Himalayas, a beautiful town. Today is the last day here, as I’m leaving tomorrow morning, been here many times. Just sharing a random picture clicked today in the afternoon, look at those clouds, I just love to gaze at those clouds floating and rolling over the hills and get lost in serenity of the nature. It’s a nice place to lose yourself in the nature for a while.

Have a good day/night all ~ Vikas Sharma

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Food for Thought #6

Below is the excerpt from J Krishnamurti’s – THIS MATTER OF CULTURE

Have you ever wondered why it is that as people grow older they seem to lose all joy in life? At present most of you who are young are fairly happy; you have your little problems, there are examinations to worry about, but in spite of these troubles there is in your life a certain joy, is there not? There is a spontaneous, easy acceptance of life, a looking at things lightly and happily. And why is it that as we grow older we seem to lose that joyous intimation of something beyond, something of greater significance? Why do so many of us, as we grow into so-called maturity, become dull, insensitive to joy, to beauty, to the open skies and the marvellous earth?

You know, when one asks oneself this question, many explanations spring up in the mind. We are so concerned with ourselves – that is one explanation. We struggle to become somebody, to achieve and maintain a certain position; we have children and other responsibilities, and we have to earn money. All these external things soon weigh us down, and thereby we lose the joy of living. Look at the older faces around you, see how sad most of them are, how careworn and rather ill, how withdrawn, aloof and sometimes neurotic, without a smile. Don’t you ask yourself why? And even when we do ask why, most of us seem to be satisfied with mere explanations.

Yesterday evening I saw a boat going up the river at full sail, driven by the west wind. It was a large boat, heavily laden with firewood for the town. The sun was setting, and this boat against the sky was astonishingly beautiful. The boatman was just guiding it, there was no effort, for the wind was doing all the work. Similarly, if each one of us could understand the problem of struggle and conflict, then I think we would be able to live effortlessly, happily, with a smile on our face.

I think it is effort that destroys us, this struggling in which we spend almost every moment of our lives. If you watch the older people around you, you will see that for most of them life is a series of battles with themselves, with their wives or husbands, with their neighbours, with society; and this ceaseless strife dissipates energy. The man who is joyous, really happy, is not caught up in effort. To be without effort does not mean that you stagnate, that you are dull, stupid; on the contrary, it is only the wise, the extraordinarily intelligent who are really free of effort, of struggle.

But, you see, when we hear of effortlessness we want to be like that, we want to achieve a state in which we will have no strife, no conflict; so we make that our goal, our ideal, and strive after it; and the moment we do this, we have lost the joy of living. We are again caught up in effort, struggle. The object of struggle varies, but all struggle is essentially the same. One may struggle to bring about social reforms, or to find God, or to create a better relationship between oneself and one’s wife or husband, or with one’s neighbour; one may sit on the banks of Ganga, worship at the feet of some guru, and so on. All this is effort, struggle. So what is important is not the object of struggle, but to understand struggle itself.

Now, is it possible for the mind to be not just casually aware that for the moment it is not struggling, but completely free of struggle all the time so that it discovers a state of joy in which there is no sense of the superior and the inferior?

Our difficulty is that the mind feels inferior, and that is why it struggles to be or become something, or to bridge over its various contradictory desires. But don’t let us give explanations of why the mind is full of struggle. Every thinking man knows why there is struggle both within and without. Our envy, greed, ambition, our competitiveness leading to ruthless efficiency – these are obviously the factors which cause us to struggle, whether in this world or in the world to come. So we don’t have to study psychological books to know why we struggle; and what is important, surely, is to find out if the mind can be totally free of struggle.

After all, when we struggle, the conflict is between what we are and what we should be or want to be. Now, without giving explanations, can one understand this whole process of struggle so that it comes to an end? Like that boat which was moving with the wind, can the mind be without struggle? Surely, this is the question, and not how to achieve a state in which there is no struggle. The very effort to achieve such a state is itself a process of struggle, therefore that state is never achieved. But if you observe from moment to moment how the mind gets caught in everlasting struggle – if you just observe the fact without trying to alter it, without trying to force upon the mind a certain state which you call peace – then you will find that the mind spontaneously ceases to struggle; and in that state it can learn enormously. Learning is then not merely the process of gathering information, but a discovery of the extraordinary riches that lie beyond the hope of the mind; and for the mind that makes this discovery there is joy.

Watch yourself and you will see how you struggle from morning till night, and how your energy is wasted in this struggle. If you merely explain why you struggle, you get lost in explanations and the struggle continues; whereas, if you observe your mind very quietly without giving explanations, if you just let the mind be aware of its own struggle, you will soon find that there comes a state in which there is no struggle at all, but an astonishing watchfulness. In that state of watchfulness there is no sense of the superior and the inferior, there is no big man or little man, there is no guru. All those absurdities are gone because the mind is fully awake; and the mind that is fully awake is joyous.

Food for Thought #5

​The problem is this, is it not, how to be free from a feeling which we name, such as anger? Not how to subjugate it, sublimate it, suppress it, which are all idiotic and immature, but how to be really free from it? To be really free from it, we have to discover whether the word is more important than the feeling. The word ‘anger’ has more significance than the feeling itself. Really to find that out there must be a gap between the feeling and the naming. That is one part. 
If I do not name a feeling, that is to say if thought is not functioning merely because of words or I do not think in terms of words, images or symbols, which most of us do – then what happens? Surely the mind then is not merely the observer. When the mind is not thinking in terms of words, symbols, images, there is no thinker separate from the thought, which is the word. Then the mind is quiet, is it not? – not made quiet, it is quiet. When the mind is really quiet, then the feelings which arise can be dealt with immediately. It is only when we give names to feelings and thereby strengthen them that the feelings have continuity ; they are stored up in the centre, from which we give further labels, either to strengthen or communicate them. ~ J. Krishnamurti

Random Thought

​When someone does something really bad that really irks you, then of course, it’s important to take that immediate opportunity to tell them about the reality. I usually used to ignore such things but through experiences I’ve realized that being kind in such instance is often just an excuse to avoid necessary conflict which you think could arise after your reaction but it’s important to react when limits has been crossed else people will take you for granted and chances are what they did will be repeated. Actually, by being nice to mean or not deserving people, you are essentially creating a reward system for their inappropriate deeds.

Let’s Spread Positivity

One of the ways to spread positivity in the world is, letting people realize that in today’s world half of the chaos is created by Media, not all you see on social networking sites and watch on TV is true.

Jaipur – Snapshots from my Travels

Few days back I’ve been to Jaipur with few of my friends, in this post just sharing a few snapshots from my travel to this place.

Jaipur is the capital and largest city of the Indian state of Rajasthan in Northern India. It is also known as the Pink City of India, located 260 km from the Indian capital New Delhi, it forms a part of the Golden Triangle tourist circuit along with Agra.

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Jal Mahal(Water Palace).

Jal Mahal (meaning “Water Palace”) is a palace located in the middle of the Man Sagar Lake in Jaipur city, the capital of the state of Rajasthan, India. The palace and the lake around it were renovated and enlarged in the 18th century by Maharaja Jai Singh II of Amber.

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Nahargarh Fort – Jaipur city view from the roof top of Nahargarh Fort

Nahargarh Fort stands on the edge of the Aravalli Hills, overlooking the pink city of Jaipur in the Indian state of Rajasthan. The view of the city from the fort is impressive.

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Nahargarh Fort

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Nahargarh Fort

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Jaipur City View through the Window of Nahargarh Fort

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Jaipur from Nahargarh Fort

Visitor Attractions:

Visitor attractions include the Hawa Mahal, Jal Mahal, City Palace, Amer Fort, Jantar Mantar, Nahargarh Fort, Jaigarh Fort, etc. The Jantar Mantar observatory and Amer Fort are one of the World Heritage Sites. Hawa Mahal is a five-storey pyramidal shaped monument with 953 windows that rises 15 metres (50 ft) from its high base. Sisodiya Rani Bagh and Kanak Vrindavan are the major parks in Jaipur.

Info Source Credit: Wikipedia
Image Credit: Vikas Sharma

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Do You Truly Know Them?

No matter what, you will never actually understand someone’s pain, until you are the one feeling it or until you truly know them. Until you have gone through it, understand it as it is or feel it, you have no clue how hard it is. I’ve seen lots of people who just judge others without knowing about them and think they know it all, and then end up making all false opinions in their mind about others. Don’t judge people before you truly know them, because behind every person, there is always a reason why they are the way they are. Ask yourself first before judging others, do you know what they are going through? Do you truly know them?

Random Thought

​Sometimes the only better way is – you have to fight fire with fire and you have to remove a thorn with a thorn.