Posts Tagged ‘ Communication ’

Harnessing Wireless Signals

It’s not a new thing that radio frequency signals can be used as both a power source and a communication medium, and moreover, the problem of wireless power has been in research since the time of Tesla. There have been perpetual researches on this topic since many years. As radio frequency signals are both the power source and the communication medium, therefore, we can re-purpose radio frequency signals that are already around us into both a source of power and a communication medium.

This technology can be useful in some of the way but it has some pitfalls too. Like it depends on radio frequency signal, so apparently it is useless at the places where there is no radio frequency signal, its effect on the other wireless system or on those from which it draws power or on anything other, will be useless in the Faraday cage like places. That is the one side, now how can it help the humans: well! It can be useful in number of ways; can be used in smart devices like phones, watches, sensors and any other wearable electronic device. This technology can be embedded into smartphones (or into other battery dependent devices) and when the battery dies, the phone could still be used for communication by using radio frequency signals. In a nutshell, this technology has ample of things to offer.

I recently read an article which says a team of researchers from the University of Washington is working on this kind of technology. They have created a wireless technology which they describe as Ambient Backscatter, which takes advantage of the TV and cellular transmissions that already surround us around the clock. It transforms existing wireless signals into both a source of power and a communication medium. The researchers built small, battery-free devices with antennas that can detect, harness and reflect a TV signal, which then is picked up by other similar devices. Using ambient backscatter, these devices can interact with users and communicate with each other without using batteries. They exchange information by reflecting or absorbing pre-existing radio signals.

There is always someone working on something somewhere around the earth, and as there are endless possibilities, so there can be endless creation which can be created by connecting the right pieces in the right place!

Reference: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130813130328.htm

Brain Computer Interface

The brain-computer interface is one of those technology which can change our world. A brain–computer interface is a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. The brain-computer interface is often directed at assisting, augmenting, or repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions, and in future, it can help in restoring damaged hearing, sight and movement in humans.

The concept of brain computer interface technology is to place small electrodes on or inside the human brain which can allow humans to interact with computers or control robotic limbs simply by thinking about how to execute those actions. This technology could improve communication and daily life for a person who is paralyzed or has lost the ability to speak from a stroke or neurodegenerative disease. Researchers have demonstrated that when humans use this brain computer interface, the brain behaves much like it does when completing simple motor skills such as kicking a ball, typing or waving a hand. That means this technology can make controlling a robotic arm or a prosthetic limb as easy as if it is your actual arm.

Several types of brain-computer interfaces are being developed and tested. The least invasive is a device placed on a person’s head that can detect weak electrical signatures of brain activity. Some basic commercial gaming products are on the market, letting people play easy games or move a mouse around a screen but this technology isn’t very reliable yet because signals from eye blinking and other muscle movements interfere too much.

It is possible that in the coming decades, we might interact with our smart devices and computers simply by using our minds; we could be operating a some smart device just by thinking about it, or could be turning lights on and off just by thinking about it, or sending an e-mail from our smart phone without even typing anything by hands. The scope of this technology is very wide and it could revolutionize everything from robotic implants and neural prosthetics, to remote controls but for now it still in its first phase.

 

 Reference: New Tasks Become as Simple as Waving a Hand With Brain-Computer Interfaces

 

Something about the internet

What is the Internet, exactly?

To some of us, the Internet is where we stay in touch with friends, get the news, shop, and play games. To some others, the Internet can mean their local broadband providers, or the underground wires and fiber-optic cables that carry data back and forth across cities and oceans. Isn’t it?

But Here’s something more about internet!

The internet, a helpful place to start is near the Very Beginning: 1974. That was the year that a few smart computer researchers invented something called the Internet Protocol Suite, or TCP/IP for short. TCP/IP created a set of rules that allowed computers to “talk” to each other and send information back and forth. TCP/IP is somewhat like human communication: when we speak to each other, the rules of grammar provide structure to language and ensure that we can understand each other and exchange ideas. Similarly, TCP/IP provides the rules of communication that ensure interconnected devices understand each other so that they can send information back and forth. As that group of interconnected devices grew from one room to many rooms and then to many buildings, and then to many cities and countries; the Internet was born.

The early creators of the Internet discovered that data and information could be sent more efficiently when broken into smaller chunks, sent separately, and reassembled. Those chunks are called packets. So when you send an email across the Internet, your full email message is broken down into packets, sent to your recipient, and reassembled. The same thing happens when you watch a video on a website like YouTube; the video files are segmented into data packets that can be sent from multiple YouTube servers around the world and reassembled to form the video that you watch through your browser. Bandwidth, this term tells you about the speed of your internet connection. If traffic on the Internet were assumed to a stream of water, the Internet’s bandwidth is equivalent to the amount of water that flows through the stream per second. So when you hear engineers talking about bandwidth, what they’re really referring to is the amount of data that can be sent over your Internet connection per second. This is an indication of how fast your connection is.

At last, the Internet is a fascinating and highly technical system, and yet for most of us today, it’s a user-friendly world where we don’t even think about the wires and equations involved. The Internet is also the backbone that allows the World Wide Web that we know and love to exist: with an Internet connection, we can access an open, ever-growing universe of interlinked web pages and applications. In fact, there are probably as many pages on the web today as there are neurons in your brain, as there are stars in the Milky Way!