Posts Tagged ‘ Electrodes ’

Brain Computer Interface

The brain-computer interface is one of those technology which can change our world. A brain–computer interface is a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. The brain-computer interface is often directed at assisting, augmenting, or repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions, and in future, it can help in restoring damaged hearing, sight and movement in humans.

The concept of brain computer interface technology is to place small electrodes on or inside the human brain which can allow humans to interact with computers or control robotic limbs simply by thinking about how to execute those actions. This technology could improve communication and daily life for a person who is paralyzed or has lost the ability to speak from a stroke or neurodegenerative disease. Researchers have demonstrated that when humans use this brain computer interface, the brain behaves much like it does when completing simple motor skills such as kicking a ball, typing or waving a hand. That means this technology can make controlling a robotic arm or a prosthetic limb as easy as if it is your actual arm.

Several types of brain-computer interfaces are being developed and tested. The least invasive is a device placed on a person’s head that can detect weak electrical signatures of brain activity. Some basic commercial gaming products are on the market, letting people play easy games or move a mouse around a screen but this technology isn’t very reliable yet because signals from eye blinking and other muscle movements interfere too much.

It is possible that in the coming decades, we might interact with our smart devices and computers simply by using our minds; we could be operating a some smart device just by thinking about it, or could be turning lights on and off just by thinking about it, or sending an e-mail from our smart phone without even typing anything by hands. The scope of this technology is very wide and it could revolutionize everything from robotic implants and neural prosthetics, to remote controls but for now it still in its first phase.

 

 Reference: New Tasks Become as Simple as Waving a Hand With Brain-Computer Interfaces