Posts Tagged ‘ Internet ’

Internet of Things – A Future Thing

Of all the technology buzz that are trending right now, perhaps the biggest one out of all is the Internet of Things. It is the one that’s going to give us the most disruption as well as the most opportunity over the coming decade, it could completely transform our way of living in future. The concept of Internet of Things first became popular in 1999 and since then this buzzword has been floating around and experts estimate that the LoT(Internet of Things) will consist of almost 50 billion objects by 2020, but what does it actually mean, what does Internet of Things mean?

Here’s something about it:

Internet of Thing is about connecting devices over the internet, letting them communicate with us, with other devices and applications via a network. It refers to the ever-growing network of physical objects that feature an IP address for internet connectivity, and the communication that occurs between these objects and other Internet-enabled devices and systems. It revolves around increased machine-to-machine communication; it’s built on cloud computing and networks of data-gathering sensors; it could make everything in our lives from household appliances to highways, from streetlights to seaports “smart.” In a nutshell, Internet of Things is based on sensors, cloud computing and a network(or internet-enabled devices).

Let’s talk about a very few examples of the Internet of Things:

Home’s light control system integrated with sensors to switch off/on the lights depending on whether there’s anyone in a room or not, alerting you of any suspicious activity on your phone and make it possible to switch off/on lights remotely; windows and doors fitted with sensor and could detect of windows and doors openings and violations to prevent intruders, and alert you of the same by texting on your number; informing you about running appliances when you are not at home, and allowing you to switch on/off remotely to save energy or to avoid accidents. A smart fridge which could text you if its internal cameras find there is none left, or that the carton has past its use-by date; energy and water supply consumption monitoring by sensors and applications to suggest/advice you how to save cost and resources.

LoT  or Internet of Thing is more than smart appliances and smart homes. It scales up to include smart cities, think of connected traffic signals that monitor utility use, or smart bins that signal when they need to be emptied, and industry with connected sensors for everything from tracking parts to monitoring crops. Constructing smart building, bridges, highways, use of smart cement equipped with sensors to monitor stresses, cracks, and alerts you to fix problems before they cause a catastrophe. If there’s congestion/damage on road, the same sensors in the concrete will detect it and communicate the information via the wireless internet to your car or on your phone to alert you.

It has limitless applications and potential, and of course there are some concerns too. This technology is full of possibilities and it’s often difficult to decide in early stage what it will bring up in coming years and will it be truly ground breaking or not.

Here’s a video on it by Intel:

Reference: The Internet of Things

Google Search in the Physical World

In future, it could be possible to run a Google search in the physical world. For example, asking Google “where are my keys?” would give you the right answer if they have been fitted with tiny motes in your home, in your surroundings or in your place. A mote is a node in a wireless sensor network that is capable of performing some processing, gathering sensory information and communicating with other connected nodes in the network.

Thousands of tiny wireless sensors(motes) could one day be used to monitor your world. They will have tiny CPUs that run programs on a skeleton operating system and be able to access equally small banks of RAM and flash memory. These sensor-packed machines can be embedded in buildings and objects in large numbers, may be in hundreds or even thousands as per requirement according to the objects to provide constant updates on the world around us.

The motes will be smart enough to collect power from their surrounding. The motes will live off the power they can get from their surroundings. A mote near a light source might use a tiny solar panel, while a mote running somewhere with greater temperature extremes can be built to tap into that, by converting the heat energy that flows between hot and cold into electricity. These tiny wireless sensors(motes) could be used to monitor every tiny movement of large structures like bridges or skyscrapers in coming decades. The motes in a house could report back on lighting, temperature, carbon monoxide levels and occupancy. With motes embedded in all of your belongings it might be possible to run interent in the physical world to search your queries, and you would hear or get the right answers.

Reference article: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21829146.400-smart-dust-computers-are-no-bigger-than-a-snowflake.html

Something about the internet

What is the Internet, exactly?

To some of us, the Internet is where we stay in touch with friends, get the news, shop, and play games. To some others, the Internet can mean their local broadband providers, or the underground wires and fiber-optic cables that carry data back and forth across cities and oceans. Isn’t it?

But Here’s something more about internet!

The internet, a helpful place to start is near the Very Beginning: 1974. That was the year that a few smart computer researchers invented something called the Internet Protocol Suite, or TCP/IP for short. TCP/IP created a set of rules that allowed computers to “talk” to each other and send information back and forth. TCP/IP is somewhat like human communication: when we speak to each other, the rules of grammar provide structure to language and ensure that we can understand each other and exchange ideas. Similarly, TCP/IP provides the rules of communication that ensure interconnected devices understand each other so that they can send information back and forth. As that group of interconnected devices grew from one room to many rooms and then to many buildings, and then to many cities and countries; the Internet was born.

The early creators of the Internet discovered that data and information could be sent more efficiently when broken into smaller chunks, sent separately, and reassembled. Those chunks are called packets. So when you send an email across the Internet, your full email message is broken down into packets, sent to your recipient, and reassembled. The same thing happens when you watch a video on a website like YouTube; the video files are segmented into data packets that can be sent from multiple YouTube servers around the world and reassembled to form the video that you watch through your browser. Bandwidth, this term tells you about the speed of your internet connection. If traffic on the Internet were assumed to a stream of water, the Internet’s bandwidth is equivalent to the amount of water that flows through the stream per second. So when you hear engineers talking about bandwidth, what they’re really referring to is the amount of data that can be sent over your Internet connection per second. This is an indication of how fast your connection is.

At last, the Internet is a fascinating and highly technical system, and yet for most of us today, it’s a user-friendly world where we don’t even think about the wires and equations involved. The Internet is also the backbone that allows the World Wide Web that we know and love to exist: with an Internet connection, we can access an open, ever-growing universe of interlinked web pages and applications. In fact, there are probably as many pages on the web today as there are neurons in your brain, as there are stars in the Milky Way!